Home > Leadership, NFL, Radio, Talent, Winning > Seahawks QB Russell Wilson Throws Out Some Radio Advice

Seahawks QB Russell Wilson Throws Out Some Radio Advice

Russell_Wilson_at_the_2013_Jessie_Vetter_Classic,_July_1,_2013“I want to be the guy who studies the most and be the smartest guy. I try to learn as much as I can about myself, about my teammates, and I think the biggest thing is I always want to learn something.”

– Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks quarterback

Russell Wilson is the star quarterback of the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks. This week, the second-year player is rebounding from his first ever loss on his home field. During his weekly press conference, he talked about overcoming the adversity and how he prepares to be the best he can each week. It occurred to me that in his role as quarterback he is both talent and manager and his advice is relevant to more than just NFL quarterbacks. So I offer up today,…

Russell Wilson’s Tips for Radio Talent and Managers

Focus on the positive. “I’m focused on what we can do extremely well. I try to really understand what I’m doing well and then I start looking at other things and try to see if there’s anything else out there.”

This is important advice. Too often in radio we focus on what went wrong. Try building on what’s going right, what works, and put yourself or your on-air staff in position to win every day.

Don’t dwell on the negative. “Sometimes, after a bad day, you need to get back to work, because that way you can put it away and move onto the next opportunity.”

Most times when things go bad everybody knows it. There’s no reason to keep beating a dead horse. Take a quick moment for everyone to acknowledge what happened and move on.

Don’t wait for feedback. “I watch everything I do; every little detail. I’m extremely critical of myself.”

In general, Program Directors and Brand Managers rarely give feedback effectively, specifically or often enough and many talent detest air-check sessions claiming to hate listening to past shows. Both sides need to step up. There’s no better way to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats than reviewing specifics of what happens on the air. If you’re not reviewing the air product with some regularity, you’re missing a great opportunity to be a remarkable broadcaster.

Be Curious. “I want to be the guy who studies the most and be the smartest guy, I try to learn as much as I can about myself, about my teammates, and I think the biggest thing is I always want to learn something.”

Curiosity is key in being better at your job from office dynamics and on-air chemistry to topic development and improving your skills and knowledge as a broadcaster. Sometimes we need to look at our life as a four-year-old and ask, “Why?” an annoyingly number of times.

Own Your Mistakes. “I just have to be better. That’s what it really comes down to. I’ll take the blame for it. I’m excited about that because I love a challenge.”

No one has time for finger-pointing, hallway whispering or co-workers who duck out of the way when trouble arrives. Raise your hand, admit your mistakes quickly and publicly. It quickly defuses the situation, builds trust and respect amongst your peers, and clears the negative energy of the office so success is possible.

Other quick insights from Russell Wilson you should follow:

  • Be able to adjust.
  • Be able to make things happen.
  • Study your craft.
  • Work with a sense of urgency.
  • Be poised.
  • Stay locked into the moment.
  • Keep believing in yourself no matter the circumstances.

Whether you are a talk host, DJ, manager or board operator – you are the quarterback of your domain. Take this advice and prepare yourself for a championship performance every day.

  1. dan mitchinson
    January 20, 2014 at 6:38 AM

    Great points! Loved the article. True about PD’s and feedback. Most PD’s spend their days in meetings, going over budgets, with doors closed, or with small circle of managers, so don’t have the time they used to for air checks, feedback and making the rounds in the newsroom. They are the ones responsible for helping talent grow, and talent needs to be the pain in their a_ _ to remind them they need to make the time….if they really want to learn and grow.

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